Insulting a politician right after her death: Does the ECHR protect the reputation of the deceased?

By Valeska David

At the end of 2014, when deciding on the admissibility of a case brought by Stalin’s grandson, who sued a newspaper and the author of an article for defamation of his grandfather, the ECtHR stated that the heir of a deceased person could not claim a violation of the latter’s article 8’s rights since they are non-transferable.[1] Less than two years later, however, the recent judgment in Genner v. Austria (Application no. 55495/08) seems to cast a shadow of doubt on that principle. Furthermore, this judgment brings about interesting questions on what can and cannot be said about a public figure who has just passed away. Before turning to these questions, let’s first examine the facts of the case.

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Mandet v. France: Child’s “duty” to know its origins prevails over its wish to remain in the dark

By Evelyn Merckx, academic assistant and doctoral researcher at the Human Rights Centre (Ghent University)

The European Court of Human Rights has delivered many judgments about a child’s right to know its origins and whether this right can prevail over the refusal of the anonymous biological parent. In Mandet v. France, the opposite scenario took place. A presumed biological father wanted to have his paternity recognised vis-à-vis a child who already had a legal and social father and asked the judges not to change his established family ties. However, the domestic courts decided that it was in the son’s best interests that he knew the truth about his origins.

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Case of Roman Zakharov v. Russia: The Strasbourg follow up to the Luxembourg Court’s Schrems judgment

By Paul De Hert and Pedro Cristobal Bocos (Vrije Universiteit Brussels)

The judgment of the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights in Roman Zakharov v. Russia last December 4, 2015 is part of the growing concern that some international human rights protection bodies have developed in the area of digital rights. This has been reflected at the European level with the judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union that cancels the Safe Harbor decision – Maximillian Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner – and the European Parliament resolution of 29 October on the mass surveillance of European citizens that recognizes, among other things, the important role played by Edward Snowden. The case comes also amid the growing concern of the United Nations (UN) on the matter that has resulted in resolution 68/167 of the General Assembly, in the reports and remarks of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), for example in September 2013 and in February 2014, and in the creation in July 2015 of a special rapporteur on the right to privacy.

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Grand Chamber challenges male-oriented view on keeping silence over mistress and lovechild in pivotal privacy case

By Dirk Voorhoof *

gsdfgdfgThe Grand Chamber’s judgment delivered on 10 November 2015 in Couderc and Hachette Filipacchi Associés v. France elaborates on the appropriate standard for privacy and the media under European human rights law. In essence, the Court discussed the public-interest value of a disputed article published in the magazine Paris Match, revealing aspects of the private life of a public person exercising an important political function. This blog, written on 11 November, Women’s Day in Belgium, focusses in particular on women’s right to tell the story of a relationship as a matter of personal identity.

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The Y.Y. v. Turkey case and trans individuals’ gender recognition

This guest post was written by Ivana Isailovic, post-doc researcher at the Perelman Center (Université libre de Bruxelles) and affiliated to the IAP, Human Rights Integration project.[1]

The Y.Y v. Turkey decision deals with the process of gender recognition, which is one of the many pressing legal issues trans[2] communities are struggling with in Europe. In its previous decision, the European Court of Human Rights has found that the State’s failure to modify the birth certificate of a person by recognizing the preferred gender constitutes a violation of the right to private life guaranteed by art. 8. For the first time, in Y.Y. v. Turkey, the Court examines the domestic requirements ­– in this case the sterilization requirement – which are necessary to obtain the legal recognition of the preferred gender.

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Dubská and Krejzová v. Czech Republic: a ‘negative’ or ‘positive’ right to give birth at home?

By Laurens Lavrysen

In the case of Dubská and Krejzová v. Czech Republic, the Strasbourg Court had to pronounce itself on the regulation of home birth under Czech law. While on the one hand Czech law allowed for home births, on the other hand it prohibited midwives from assisting them. In its judgment of 11 December, the Court found no violation of the right to respect for private life (Article 8), mainly based on the increased risks to the lives and health of newborn and mother vis-à-vis a hospital birth in case of complications. The Court thereby endorsed the paradoxical Czech legal framework under which relatively safe home births with the assistance of a midwife are prohibited on health grounds, whereas unsafe home births without such assistance are allowed. It is argued that by constructing the case as one involving a narrow conception of ‘interference’, the Court failed to look at the broader picture of what it means to effectively secure a human right. Such a more holistic understanding requires an appreciation of both ‘negative’ and ‘positive’ aspects of Article 8 at stake in the present case.

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Ivinović v. Croatia: legal capacity and the (missing) call for supportive decision-making

Valeska David is a PhD Researcher at the Human Rights Centre of Ghent University and a member of the Research Network “The Global Challenge of Human Rights Integration: Towards a Users’ Perspective.”

We have all heard about the so-called paradigm shift brought about by the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The social model of disability and the duty of reasonable accommodation are some of the “conceptual innovations” reshaping human rights law. However, we know much less about what that means in practice. One field in which this question has utmost importance is that of legal capacity of persons with disabilities, particularly of those with intellectual, psychosocial and sensory impairments. The recent judgment of the European Court of Human Rights in Ivinović v. Croatia, like other cases decided against the same state, deals with that issue: the legal capacity of persons with disability. The decision is part of a growing corpus of disability case law and is welcome for a number of reasons – which I briefly sketch here. Yet, in this post, I suggest looking at this judgment as somewhat of a missed opportunity. Continue reading